10 Jan 2013 @ 4:03 AM 

Some thieves apparently broke into a building on Microsoft’s corporate campus in Mountain View, California over the Christmas holiday. They sole only iPads, leaving the Microsoft Surfaces (tablets) and computers that were likely laying around. The news at this site mentions that there were no sales for 4 weeks as reported from a retail tracking firm.  Ever since Microsoft stopped Silverlight development in favor of WinRT (Windows 8) based apps, and created that stupid flat menu system (this is the age of high-end digital 3D graphics is it not?) I knew this would happen.  I’m not sure why Microsoft is being ignorant in this regard (perhaps too arrogant?).  Look at this Apple tablet concept idea (fake):

 

Now look at this Microsoft tablet:

I’m telling you, whoever is in charge of this designed was on something, or has serious mental competency issues. This looks like the menu designed for little kids, and not for any serious computer user.  What do you think?

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 10 Jan 2013 @ 05:15 AM

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 17 Oct 2012 @ 11:50 PM 

I work in Healthcare and it blew my mind when I found out that a developer hired by a hospital (already a no-no) developed software using MongoDB for an enterprise database for relational type data. To make matters worse, they were attempting to remake existing software which already had relational data! I think it was a cheap compromise because it made one aspect of their issue “go away”. What was it? SPACE. It wasn’t even an issue! There were over 200 fields in the original table, and their idea was “well, if we only use some of the fields, then we can save space.” :( They, however, failed to realize that almost ALL the fields get filled out DURING THE COURSE OF THE PATIENT’S THERAPY.

Why is this stupid? Consider this database table:

FirstName   LastName
John        Doe

and now this MongoDO record:

{FirstName:John,LastName:Doe}

The characters in the table above would only be 7, plus 1 or 2 bytes for length for each column, so perhaps 9 (for varchar(50), UTF-8). The second example would be the characters as shown: 29!

So … where is the space savings? There is none (unless a case gets cancelled or something). To make matters worse, MongoDB is NOT SUPPORTED natively by most reporting software. Many hospitals have report writers, and they will not be able to work well with it (for ad-hoc reporting). To make matters even WORSE AGAIN, there are few DBAs (and none in most places) who even know what to do with it. Also, what about renaming columns? You’d have to update every record!!! What about trigger events, special stored procedures, and transactions!? Nothing.

Don’t be stupid or lazy, and don’t put databases back to the stone ages – and if anyone tells you “but it scales!”, just picture a big “L” on their forehead from now on. Just stick with more efficient databases that have evolved over the decades – which CAN also scale in their own way (see here and here).

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 01 Nov 2012 @ 10:36 PM

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Categories: Coding, Databases

 19 Aug 2012 @ 12:03 AM 

First, before I begin, let it be known, I love Silverlight, and I plan to keep developing in it (visit my site here at jamonjoo.com).  That said, I don’t know why I have the feeling that all this Silverlight stuff is a ploy to get developers onto Windows 8, which just so happens to be XAML based; I hope I’m wrong.  All I can say is if Silverlight becomes a “Microsoft-Device-OS-Only Cross-Device Platform” [say that 5 times fast], then it will confirm my suspicion. I can only hope that Moonlight will start supporting multiple OS’s and devices also in time, and perhaps that may be a saving grace (and perhaps Microsoft should help it do so – it would only work in their favor), but I wouldn’t hold my breath.  Honestly, the whole thought of having to resort back to HTML/JavaScript makes me feel a bit feral.  I have yet to see companies cooperate with standards; even in healthcare HL7 interface communications (I’ve done a lot of work in software development for Healthcare).  The only true way to build something to run across multiple systems, devices, etc., and have it look/run the same everywhere is NOT by standards, but to either 1. Have a single company create and maintain the development platform (tainted sometimes by money and politics), or 2. Built it open source by the community (which will probably lack somewhat in quality and coherency (due to volunteers), and good development tools).

Of course, the other “SMART” thing MS could do (and may be doing [see: http://bit.ly/NLo0jm]) is to continue to have SL as a means to run software cross-platform, while also supporting XAML/C# apps it in all their own platforms.  This might attract many developers to the Microsoft platforms, knowing that they can also easily have versions to run on other non-MS platforms as well (which I assumed SL was going all along a few years back).

In conclusion, if SL doesn’t work out, then I’m creating my own, and HTML/JS can [insert vulgar statement here] … anyone else on board!? LOL ;)

All that said, I suppose also, in time, if SL5 gets deployed with Windows 8 – along with the increase in XAML/C# apps, and the market place – and since SL5 I’m sure will be around for quite some time, there’s a good chance there will be a future time when SL5 (at the very least) will still be a great platform to use, since it may be on the majority of computers around the world (http://bit.ly/8l4Y9Q). Honestly, I’m still optimistic in any case. ;)

 

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 19 Aug 2012 @ 05:02 PM

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Categories: Silverlight

 30 May 2012 @ 3:58 AM 

I have have a solution that works really well for those who need to know when a child element is added or removed within their custom control. The ‘Children’ property is actually found by the parser using the “ContentProperty” attribute, and I think it’s inheritable. Anyhow, if you simply put this in your derived class:

new public ObservableCollection<UIElement> Children { get { return _Children; } }
readonly ObservableCollection<UIElement> _Children = new ObservableCollection<UIElement>();

Then all the added elements will now go to this new collection instead! :) All you have to do it listen to the “CollectionChanged” event.

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 17 Jun 2012 @ 04:01 AM

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 24 Feb 2012 @ 6:09 PM 

Well, this was a little crazy. I had TFS installed with SharePoint on the same VM, and all was well until the VMs were moved to a new host. I’m not sure what the cause was – perhaps the change in IP – but I had to reinstall the extensions for SharePoint 2010. Problem is, THERE IS NO SEPARATE INSTALL! :( In fact, my online research reviled something I forgot – it’s installed with the TFS installer when you check off a box at some point. One article I found touched on the location for the logs, and as it turns out, the logs have the EXACT command line that was required to install what I needed! Perfect. This was the log section (found in “C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Team Foundation\Server Configuration\Logs” on Server 2008 x64):

[Info @23:26:00.960] Deploying solution: Microsoft.TeamFoundation.SharePoint.wsp.
[Info @23:26:00.960] Process starting: fileName=C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\bin\stsadm.exe arguments=-o deploysolution -name Microsoft.TeamFoundation.SharePoint.wsp -local -force
[Info @23:26:06.171] Process finished: fileName=C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\bin\stsadm.exe arguments=-o deploysolution -name Microsoft.TeamFoundation.SharePoint.wsp -local -force exitCode=0 in 5225 ms
[Info @23:26:06.171]
[Info @23:26:06.171] Operation completed successfully.

I think this log was from an old installation where the extensions were installed separately, not really sure, because the “\12\” part of the path in the log didn’t exist, but “\14\” did, and in the newer logs, the section above didn’t exist, and instead I had this message: “The solution has no features to activate.”  The “Microsoft.TeamFoundation.SharePoint.wsp” didn’t seem to be installed at all (event though it was working!!!). With that, I ran this:

C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\BIN>stsadm.exe -o deploysolution -name Microsoft.TeamFoundation.SharePoint.wsp -local -force

Bingo! The command ran, completed, and my service was back online!!! :)

Ok, now that the service is back online, I noticed two other things missing as well after reading this site: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/teams_wit_tools/archive/2009/11/24/tfs-2010-beta2-troubleshooting-sharepoint-configuration-issues-tf249038.aspx

The Dashboard and TSWA .wsp installs were missing also! Fortunately this is also a “simple” fix (simple of course once you figure out how to do it ;) ).

C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\BIN>stsadm.exe -o deploysolution -name Microsoft.TeamFoundation.SharePoint.wsp -local -force
C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\BIN>stsadm.exe -o deploysolution -name tswawebpartcollection.wsp -local -force -url http://localhost

That did it! :) Pay special attention to the second line – your URL/Port for your virtual server may be different.

That’s it, have fun! :)

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 19 Aug 2012 @ 02:04 PM

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 23 Dec 2010 @ 4:25 PM 

“So, we thank God for his son, the birth of our Christ, who in his death made a sacrifice. Thus brings the age of grace for one and all, from young to old, from big to small. Whatever you’ve done, regrets you may hold, unforgiveness you carry, or hearts gone cold. The anger or bitterness, you have yet to let go, God’s son can come in and melt it like snow. It’s never too late, to open the door, and let him come in, to worry no more. To have him as comfort, to not be alone, and then to be with him, when we get to go home.”

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 19 Aug 2012 @ 02:15 PM

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Categories: Poems

 18 Aug 2010 @ 7:28 AM 

Anyone have WHM/cPanel and need GD installed for PHP? Well, turns out you have to rebuild PHP … but don’t worry! If you have access to the WHM control panel (for server administration) simply do a search for “Apache”, click on “EasyApache (Apache Update), follow the prompts until you get to “Exhaustive Options List”, check off GD (and anything else you need), then complete any other prompts.

Note: May take quite a few minutes to finish, so don’t close any windows until it does!

It wasn’t straight forward on any other place I researched. Took quite awhile to figure it out, so I hope it helps you!

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 18 Aug 2010 @ 07:30 AM

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Categories: WHM/cPanel

 14 Jul 2010 @ 2:17 AM 

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LOL!!!

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 14 Jul 2010 @ 02:19 AM

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 14 Jul 2010 @ 2:05 AM 

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LOL!!!

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 14 Jul 2010 @ 02:19 AM

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 14 Jul 2010 @ 1:25 AM 

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The suspense!!!

Posted By: James
Last Edit: 14 Jul 2010 @ 02:09 AM

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Categories: Funny Videos